This is the fourth in a series of articles on how to get the most out of your iPhone.  I have been using iPhones for more than five years and have discovered hundreds of useful features within this marvelous device.  These articles will help you discover the hidden power of your iPhone.

KEYBOARD “HIDDEN” CHARACTERS

The iPhone keyboard looks simple. It is too small to provide special characters. But they are there, just waiting for you to reveal them.

Where is the caps lock?

Double-tap the caps key  in the lower left corner of the keyboard, and the up-arrow will become dark and underlined, indicating caps lock is on. Tap it again to turn caps lock off.

Where are the number and punctuation keys?

Tap the 123 key at the lower left of the keyboard to see the number and basic punctuation keyboard.

What if my special punctuation isn’t there?

Here’s the trick. Hold your finger on a letter or other character to reveal a list of special characters. Slide your finger to the desired character. When you release your finger, the selected character will be inserted into your text.

For example, hold:

the letter a to select from [ a à á ä æ ã ]
12b$ to select from [ ¥  $ ¢ £]
0 (zero) to insert  °   (degrees symbol)
& to insert  §  (section symbol)
. (period) to insert  …  (ellipses)
“  to select from  [ «  »  „  “  ” ] (smart quotes)
– to select from [-  –  —  •](dash, n-dash, m-dash and bullet dot)

Try holding other keys and see what you get.

VOTER REGISTRATION REVISITED

In the August issue of ICNV I discussed how simple it is to register to vote using you mobile phone or computer by going to RegisterToVote.ca.gov.

Once you are registered, you can elect to permanently vote by mail.

You won’t have to wait in line at the polls. And once you vote, after a week or so, you will stop receiving mailed literature from most candidates or organizations soliciting your vote.

Jake Jacobs

Jake Jacobs

Jake Jacobs is a retired electrical engineer. He has worked many years in the high- tech arenas of Silicon Valley, MIT, and Orange County, where he co-founded a medical device company. He has taught introductory computer science at Stanford University. He has created and taught iPhone workshops locally for three years.
Jake Jacobs

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